Therapy or Drugs? Weighing the Options When it Comes to Treating ADHD Aug29

Therapy or Drugs? Weighing the Options When it Comes to Treating ADHD...

If you asked anyone what the treatment was for ADHD, they would likely be quick to rattle off the name of some stimulant drug. Nearly 70% of legal stimulants are made and used in the United States, and this is in part due to the fact that big prescription drug companies not only advertise these drugs heavily to doctors and patients alike, they also fund medical research for disorders like ADHD. Drug companies have been promoting their products to doctors for years, but doctors used to keep a safe distance from these salesmen. It wasn’t until the 80s that the two began to join forces, when legislation was passed to allow for-profit companies to take responsibility for federally funded research findings. At this point it was actually encouraged for medical researchers to combine their efforts with these big pharmaceutical companies. As the relationship between pharmaceutical companies and doctors grows, more patients with ADHD and other behavioral disorders continue to be treated with drugs, like Adderall and Ritalin, despite the fact that other intervention treatments have been found to be effective in the treatment of these disorders. Handing out drugs so liberally is especially concerning among children diagnosed with ADHD, and nearly 5.2 million children between the ages of 13 and 17 have been diagnosed with it in the U.S. Given the choice, most parents would likely opt for non-drug related treatments before turning to the use of drugs. Behavioral intervention has been shown to help both children and adults who suffer from ADHD, including improvements in parenting skills, coping methods and academic performance. While more research is needed to look at specific methods of behavioral intervention and other forms of therapy as it relates to certain disorders, there have been clearly defined benefits from...

Five-Year Plan Suggests Ways For Illinois to Recover Economically Aug29

Five-Year Plan Suggests Ways For Illinois to Recover Economically...

Just as state economy of Illinois was slow to feel the effects of the Great Recession, so too has been slow to recover from it. Now, Illinois’s Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity is submitting to the General Assembly a five-year plan that has suggestions for business growth. The measures include doubling tax credits for the poor, and investing in major infrastructures and calling on lawmakers to support support existing business growth with incentives like tax breaks. The plan also wants to raise Illinois’s minimum wage from $8.25 an hour to $10 an hour, which could prove to be a very effective strategy, according to Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations on the Urbana campus and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago. “We analyzed the impact that raising the minimum wage has on employment, hours and income, and concluded that it’s the best way to reduce wage inequality, grow the state economy and ensure that workers are paid a wage that’s commensurate with the cost of living,” Bruno said. “And most importantly, we found that raising the minimum wage would have no discernible negative effect on total employment.” According to Dave Roeder, a DCEO spokesperson, the future economic success of Illinois depends on focused business expansion — on job creation. “Trying to poach business from another state is not a viable long-term strategy,” said Roeder. “Most of your growth comes from what you have already here. We have identified sectors where we are strong and we want to get stronger.” In order to do this, Roeder believes that the state needs to change its business climate. In order to do that, the Illionis needs to market itself better to business, which would likely mean investing at least 20% of its resources into...

As the Internet of Things Expands, So Do the Security Risks, According to Hewlett-Packard Study...

The Internet of Things: once no more than speculative science fiction, it’s now a reality as we see more and more devices connected to the internet. From our phones and computers to our home security systems and garage doors, the Internet of Things allows us to connect to any device, any time, anywhere — and it’s projected to grow to 26 billion individual units by the year 2020, according to Gartner, Inc. research. But could this connectivity have a negative impact on our security? Computer manufacturer Hewlett-Packard says yes. A previous survey by the firm revealed that as many as 70 percent of devices had potentially exploitable vulnerabities, leading tech blog SiliconANGLE to refer to the Internet of Things as “the Internet of Gaping Holes.” The most recent survey expounds on these vulnerabilities, utilizing the company’s Fortify application security unit to analyze the 10 most popular consumer “internet things” available. The results: 250 different security vulnerabilities in those few products, averaging out to 25 faults in each. HP didn’t identify which products were tested, but they reported that they came from manufacturers of “TVs, webcams, home thermostats, remote power outlets, sprinkler controllers, hubs for controlling multiple devices, door locks, home alarms, scales and garage door openers.” While many of these items use a basic version of the Linux operating system, they are often built without the taking a traditional computer’s security concerns into consideration. Mike Armistead, VP and general manager of HP’s Fortify division, explained that the lack of security is likely due to one main cause: manufacturers want to put their devices on the market without having to spend extensive time testing them and providing them with protections from attacks. Of the study’s finding, some selected vulnerabilities included: Eight devices failing to require a password stronger...

Pebble Beach Car Auctions for 2014 Reach an All-Time High with $400 Million in Total Sales Aug29

Pebble Beach Car Auctions for 2014 Reach an All-Time High with $400 Million in Total Sales...

For wealthy car enthusiasts and auction houses alike, the annual Pebble Beach auctions are the place to be in the search for rare and expensive vehicles. This year’s classic car auctions during the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, in Monterey, Calif., were held once again by RM Auctions, Gooding & Co., and Bonhams. Sales this year reached a record $400 million in total between all auction houses. Hagerty Insurance, which insures and tracks the value of classic cars, reported that the sales over the four-day event were 28% higher than last year’s total. The top sale went through Bonhams, which auctioned off a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Coupe for a record-breaking $38,115,000; the second highest sale of all time was just shy of $30 million last year. While the price may seem ostentatious to many, the same model Ferrari has sold in private sales for upwards of $50 million in recent years. All of the top 10 sales, in fact, were Ferrari models from the 1950s and 1960s, except for a 1965 Ford GT40 Prototype Roadster, which came in seventh place at a sale of $6.93 million and was sold through RM Auctions. Overall, even the middle of the market saw increases over last year’s auction results at Pebble Beach. The average sale price rose 29% to %535,648; the median grew to $99,000, according to Hagerty Insurance. And although pre-war cars and European makes dominated the auction blocks, auction houses have also begun to include more Japanese brands, which are seeing more collections over the past few years. A Mazda Cosmo from 1967 and a 1972 Nissan Skyline both sold for more than $200,000 a piece — greatly exceeding their pre-auction estimates. If auction houses also disclose any private deals that took place after the events...

Judge Rejects Claim That Traffic Cameras Predominantly Placed in Poor Neighborhoods Aug27

Judge Rejects Claim That Traffic Cameras Predominantly Placed in Poor Neighborhoods...

A Cleveland, Ohio judge dismissed a lawsuit stating that traffic cameras in the area are unfairly placed in poor and African-American neighborhoods, only to receive backlash from the local community for his decision to not hear the case. Judge Cassandra Collier-Williams, who dismissed the case just recently, said that the lawsuit was not just because the organization that filed it was trying to benefit the East Cleveland Project, with a certain Pastor A.J. Thompson representing the group fighting for the cause. This may seem unfair to some, but upon reviewing Ohio state laws, it is unlawful to not have a lawyer represent an organization — and TUA Help Save East Cleveland Project states that they are indeed an organization. Collier-Williams also stated that the claim was improperly filed. Legal snares are always an issue in the world of law, which is why people hire lawyers. Lawyers understand the ins and outs of local, state, and federal laws, depending on what their specialty is. Lawyers are particularly busy when it comes to personal claims. For example, the average length of divorce proceedings last about one year, and on average, only 3% of drivers ever contest their citations. Pastor Thompson, the head of TUA Help Save East Cleveland Project, sued Xerox Corp. last March for unjustly placing too many traffic cameras in a dominantly African-American neighborhood. Along with Xerox, American Traffic Solutions and the city of East Cleveland were also defendants in this potential case. Speed cameras are often used to reduce traffic violations, decrease crashes, and prevent injuries to pedestrians and drivers alike. Thirty days before a Cleveland traffic camera is installed, the city is required to inform the general public of its whereabouts. The claim stated that these automated traffic cameras are a violation...