Following ATP, ITF Proposes Increase in Prize Money for All Pro Ranks, Aims to Narrow Gender Prize Gap...

Tennis is big business for professional players, and even those in the lower ranks can earn a decent purse playing in a tournament. But now the Association of Tennis Professionals and the International Tennis Federation propose upping the stakes for players of all levels. The ATP announced that it would increase prize money 14% each year over the next four years for nine of its Masters 1000 tournaments. These tournaments are some of the highest-level events besides Grand Slam tournaments. Shortly after the announcement last Wednesday, the ITF proposed increases in prize money on the ITF Pro Circuit. This, however, is the lowest level of sanctioned professional tennis. Both increases would give big name pros and up-and-coming tennis stars alike the chance to bring home more money. The ITF surveyed more than 7,000 players and stakeholders in tennis and analyzed 14 years of data about the sport in order to determine by how much the prize money should increase. The survey revealed a difference in prize money earned for the top 1% of male and female players. The top 50 males earned 60% of all prize money; the top 1% of females, which only number 26, earned 51% of prizes. The survey also showed a lower success rate for players trying to achieve a professional ranking, while more ranked players were competing in junior tennis instead. In response to the survey’s results, the ITF proposed an increase in prize money for pros of all levels. Currently, men’s tournaments through ITF have total purses of $10,000 to $15,000, while women’s tennis gives prizes between $10,000 and $100,000. Larger prizes for male players are handled by the ATP Challenger Tour, whereas the Women’s Tennis Association delegates Challenger-level tournaments to the ITF. Under the new proposal, which will...

Illegal immigration on the Rise; Deportations on the Decline in 2014 Dec23

Illegal immigration on the Rise; Deportations on the Decline in 2014...

According to new statistics from the Department of Homeland Security, the number of illegal immigrants who crossed the border in 2014 rose, while at the same time the amount of deportations dropped. With both legal and illegal immigration rates already incredibly high, the new data signals potential problems for each side of the immigration enforcement equation. Apprehensions on the border, which Homeland Secretary Jeh Johnson say are used to measure illegal immigration rates overall, rose by 16% in fiscal year 2014. At the same time, deportations from within the U.S. — which is used to measure how well the administration is going after long-time illegal immigrants — fell by 24%. “This year’s statistics are informed by a number of complex and shifting factors, most notably the 68% increase in migration from countries other than Mexico, predominately from Central America, and a 14% drop in Mexican migration since fiscal year 2013,” said Johnson. These numbers come as the latest edition in a recent string of bad years for illegal immigration. In 2012, a historical numeric high of nearly 41 million immigrants lived in the United States, an estimated 11.4 million or 28% of whom were illegal. To make this most recent collection of data worse, it covers October 1, 2013 to September 30, 2014, which means it’s all from before President Barack Obama announced his new temporary amnesty on November 20 — an act which is likely to lower deportation rates even more. As for the immigrants who were deported, the administration said that about 87,000 of the 102,000 immigrants deported had criminal records, which means only about 15,000 rank-and-file illegal immigrants with no criminal records were deported. This, in turn, means that one illegal immigrant was deported for every 1,000 illegal immigrants living in the United States. On the...

HGTV Reality TV Star of ‘Flip It To Win It’ Accused of Defrauding Investor of $6 Million...

Reality star Todd Hill, better known to fans as Mr. Flip It, is facing the reality of a multi-million dollar fraud lawsuit. It seems as though the star of HGTV’s hit show “Flip It To Win It” won’t be flipping houses or winning any time soon. In fact, he may be losing. The home improvement network’s show about Bay Area real estate starred Hill as a savvy, charming developer who snagged up old houses, renovated them at lightening speed, and then resold the properties for a quick, easy profit. Now, Hill, of Los Gatos, is embroiled in a lawsuit after being accused of defrauding his top investor of $6 million. On top of that, his reality TV co-star and close friend Mike Kaufman has ended their friendship and cut all ties. HGTV swiftly canceled plans for a second show following news of the lawsuit. Even Hill’s side gig of giving lectures on how to flip homes and turn a profit has ended. Mike Kaufman, the other host of HGTV’s “Flip It to Win It,” said the allegations against his co-star both “shocked and saddened” him. When the show premiered last year, Hill and Kaufman were close family friends. Kaufman, who is also a Los Gatos native, felt he had little to no choice but to break off their friendship. The friends were the show’s dynamic duo power team, once turning a profit of $789,000 on one flipped house. Now it seems, Hill has flipped it to lose it all. “I did my due diligence, and I was obviously concerned about public perception and my reputation, given the exposure we shared both in the community and on national television,” Kaufman said. His cautions originated from a civil lawsuit by Woodside developer Max Keech, who claims...

Percentage of PA Children on Medicaid Receiving Dental Care Has Increased, Review Shows Dec18

Percentage of PA Children on Medicaid Receiving Dental Care Has Increased, Review Shows...

More Pennsylvania children enrolled in Medicaid are getting dental care than before, researchers from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia say. Although all children enrolled in Medicaid have access to teeth cleanings and checkups, only about 40% of eligible children actually received care annually prior to 2005. “Somehow, a high number of kids don’t make it; they don’t get the care they need,” pediatrician Katherine Yun explained to NBC Philadelphia Dec. 16 But between 2005 and 2010, that percentage rose to 55%, according to a recent review of state records. The improvement was even more dramatic among Latino children; 63% of Latino kids between the age of five and 10 received preventive dental care in 2010, up from just 35 percent in 2005. Racial minorities and children from poor households are more likely to get dental cavities, Yun explained, so this is an important gain. There are probably multiple factors at play in the increase, but Yun noted that over the last few years, she’s seen more healthcare providers willing to accept Medicaid insurance. Integrated Dental Health Yun said another reason for the uptick may be that social services and schools have placed more emphasis on how dental health contributes to general health. “For example, for a child to enroll in Head Start, they need to go see a dentist,” Yun said. Some elementary schools also arrange for on-site checkups by dental professionals. Often, people make the mistake of assuming that dental care matters less for children, particularly before they lose their baby teeth. But healthy baby teeth preserve dental health for when adult teeth grow in, and children and adolescents are at serious risk for dental decay that can lead not to only tooth loss, but a series of interconnected health concerns later in life....

Poor Food Label Education Hampers Battle Against Food Waste Dec15

Poor Food Label Education Hampers Battle Against Food Waste...

How many times have you grabbed a sauce or condiment from the back of the fridge to use for dinner — only to find that the item is past its expiration date? Most of us can probably think of several times within the last month alone that we reluctantly tossed some type of food in the trash because the label told us it was no longer good. As wasteful as it seems, it’s hard to blame anyone for adhering to the recommended expiration date printed on food labels. It hardly seems worth the risk to eat something that could potentially make you sick, even if it looks and smells all right. The fact of the matter is, however, that most of the food we throw away is probably fine to eat a majority of the time. Emma Marsh, head of the U.K.-based food waste management group “Love Food Hate Waste,” told National Geographic that “more than half the food [British consumers] throw out is food we could have eaten.” Considering that hundreds of millions of people around the world don’t have enough food to get by on, throwing away so much perfectly good food seems a crime. That’s not to mention that all of the food that is thrown away each year adds up to about $750 billion in wasted food costs, according to National Geographic. One major problem is labeling. For the most part, food labels play a key role in providing consumers with important information about different products. They also tell users when food is past its prime; however, they do so in a number of different ways. Phrases like “best before,” “use by,” and “sell by” all have different meanings, but most consumers only go by the date that appears on...