Anti-Radiation Chip Developed for Smartphones as Scientists Study Link Between Technology and Cancer...

The potential long-term health effects of smartphones have prompted an international study and the development of an accessory that reduces cell phone radiation. According to Electronics News, a team of 31 scientists from 14 different countries have joined forces to find a link between long-term heavy cell phone usage and cancer. As part of their research, the scientists stated that their goal was to prove or disprove the claim that cell phone radiation is “possibly carcinogenic to humans.” This global study is in response to a joint report released by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC.) In the report, both organizations claim that cell phones can possibly cause brain cancer. As consumers begin to take notice of these claims, inventors are already beginning to introduce products that can drastically reduce or eliminate cell phone radiation. Telecommunication development engineer Aaron Leibovich has created a thin universal adhesive chip that “significantly reduces” radiation from all mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. Users typically keep smartphones at a distance of at least an inch away from their face to limit radiation exposure, but many scientists believe this may not be enough. Leibovich agrees with this assessment, and urges consumers to educate themselves on the effects of cell phone radiation. “Parents, schools, and employers should seriously consider providing their children, students, and employees with these products given the recent court rulings in Italy and Israel and the ongoing court case in Washington D.C. where 29 high-profile law suits are being brought about by people whose brain tumors were caused by their mobile phone are finally moving to trial,” Leibovich said. Brain cancer is quite rare compared to other types of the disease, and according to the National Cancer Institute, the...

No Need For Needles — Dentists are Using Tiny Electrical Shocks to Administer Anasthetic...

For many, a visit to the dentist is an unwanted and terrifying prospect — particularly for those who are afraid of needles. With this in mind, researchers from the University of Sao Paolo set out to find a way to deliver anesthesia to dental patients without using needles. In a recent study published in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, the researchers shared their findings and results. They claim that they could not only eliminate the use of needles in the anesthesia process but could also potentially save on costs and improve the outcome of such procedures. “Needle-free administration could save costs, improve patient compliance, facilitate application and decrease the risks of intoxication and contamination,” said the study’s co-author, Professor Renata Fonseca Vianna Lopez. “This may facilitate access to more effective and safe dental treatments to thousands of people around the world.” Typically, dentists use anesthetics to minimize the pain of common procedures brought on by tooth decay. And considering tooth decay is five times more common than asthma and four times more common than childhood obesity, many a dental patient will receive anesthetic treatment at some point. However, a fear of needles often stops patients from receiving treatment altogether. According to the study, those who are extremely afraid of needles will often cancel their appointments as a result. Instead, the researchers have determined that a tiny electrical current — through what is called iontophoresis — will make the anesthetics more effective while reducing the amount of pain, fear, and discomfort the patient experiences. For the study, the researchers first prepared a polymer hydrogel that would better stick to the mouth’s lining. From there, they added two anesthetic drugs — prilocaine hydrochloride and lidocaine hydrochloride. They then tested the gel on the mouth lining of...

Nothing Interrupts School Work Like Mold...

While the recent teacher protests in Detroit have been largely fueled by the poor education system in place, health concerns about the neglect of maintenance and hygiene of school buildings are equally to blame, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution. After teachers began complaining of severe headaches and simply feeling ill while in the buildings, they started striking by staging “sick-outs.” At Spain Elementary School, large humps in the floor began to manifest as a result of roof damage where water from rain and snow was able to seep in. The moisture in the floor in both Spain Elementary and other city schools in turn encouraged the growth of harmful mold. “There’s cold air that just gushes through there as well as the mold,” said Nancy Muerhoff, a teacher at Carleton Elementary. State legislators have already toured some of the buildings, but city officials plan to inspect all Detroit Public Schools by the end of April. Unfortunately, Detroit schools are not the only educational institutions feeling the repercussions of indoor environments conducive to the growth of mold. The Miami Hurricane reports that a number of freshman students returned to the Rosborough Tower of Stanford Residential College after winter break to find mold growing on their clothes, shoes, appliances, and even the walls and carpets. The clothes had a lot of sentimental value and it was just a heart-wrenching experience to be welcomed back by such a sight,” said freshman, Gyles Ward. The college is located in Miami, FL, which has the perfect humid climate and high heat where mold thrives. Any area that experiences high humidity rates is at serious risk of growing mold if areas are not properly cleaned and maintained, especially in fabrics and textiles such as carpets or clothing. The cause...

Intel’s X-Ray Helmet Confirms That the Future is Now...

Intel’s newest creation is a very palpable reminder that the future is now. Their newest product is a helmet that has glasses with a kind of x-ray vision, using a Realsense 3D camera. The glasses have the ability to see through objects, allowing the wearer to peer at the inner-workings of anything they set their sights on. The glasses were released at CES in Las Vegas and were co-developed with an augmented reality company called Daqri. While Intel’s newest product may read similarly to consumer devices such as Hololens and Google Glass, the Daqri Smart Helmet was designed for industrial use. Typical x-ray scanners take up to 30 frames per second. But according to The Guardian, the helmet allows wearers to see through objects using “real-time overlay of information, such as wiring diagrams, schematics and problem areas that need fixing.” This innovation is a great technological achievement for Intel. For years, the company has been trying to transcend their singular reputation of making computer chips. In 2014, the company launced CES as a follow-up to its previous Perceptual Computing platform. Now, using RealSense technology equipped with a 360-degree sensor and Intel’s core m7 processor, the final product claims to be the “most powerful AR wearable device” on the market. “The Daqri Smart Helmet is a great example of integrating advanced human-machine interface into existing devices to make something smart and solve a potential problem,” said Bridget Karlin, managing director of Intel’s internet of things strategy office. According to sputniknews.com, Intel’s smart helmet hopes to help maximize safety and productivity procedures for workers, making it easier for them to solve problems in the workplace. So far, it has undergone testing via a number of Fortune 100 companies across many industries, including gas, oil, and construction....

BowieNet: David Bowie’s Prophetic Vision of the Internet...

In a world where Google was still just a number, one visionary artist saw cyberspace’s potential, and took his art to this bleeding edge. Without David Bowie, the Internet may not be what it is today. Nowadays, 3.366 billion people — 46.4 % of the global population — use the Internet. It’s become such a part of everyday life that people can take their smartphones out, ask Google a question, and get their answer. About 75% of people never even have to scroll past the first page of search engine results. However, there was a time when the Internet was a luxury. In 1998, there were only 147 million Internet users, just 3.6% of the global population. It was also the year that BowieNet was born, a service that gave users online access to a myriad of Bowie’s photos, videos, and songs, as well as his exclusive, upcoming material and chats hosted by Ziggy Stardust himself. For just $19.95 a month, users got five megabytes of space to create their own personal sites that could have music and video plugins to regular webpages. Essentially, it was “a music-centric social network,” years before the rise of MySpace and Facebook, The Guardian reported. “I wanted to create an environment where not just my fans, but all music fans could be part of a single community where vast archives of music and information could be accessed, views stated and ideas exchanged,” said Bowie at the time of his service’s launch. BowieNet was not his only online entrepreneurial venture, either. In 1994, he released a CD ROM alongside his track “Jump, They Say,” allowing consumers to create their own accompanying music video. In 1996, he put a new song — “Telling Lies” — out exclusively online, selling 300,000...